#TheGirlFromParis by Ella Carey @Ella_Carey @bookouture #BlogTour #BooksOnTour #GuestPost

I am delighted to share a guest post with you today by Ella Carey who tells us why she chooses to write about topic she knows very little about! Today on my stop on The Girl From Paris Blog Tour

Vianne rushes through the crowded streets of Paris as the German bombs begin to fall. As she rounds the corner she sees the familiar spires of the old church burst into flames. Too late, she realizes that her mother and sister are trapped inside…

Paris, 1918. The end of war is in sight, and young seamstress Vianne Mercier is longing for the day when she can stop sewing military uniforms and start creating the beautiful dresses that she has been dreaming up in her head.

But just when it seems like peace is within reach, Vianne’s mother and sister are killed in a terrible air raid. To make matters worse, Vianne’s brother has returned home a changed man. Controlling and cruel, he presents Vianne with an ultimatum; give up her dreams of becoming a designer, or be forced onto the streets, penniless and alone.

With nothing left for her in Paris but sad memories, she decides to sail for New York. Determined not to look back, she throws herself into her new life—spending her days sewing dresses for wealthy Upper East Side women, and her evenings dancing the Charleston to Duke Ellington in the new downtown clubs. When Vianne meets handsome Italian Giorgio Conti, he encourages her career, and she feels safe for the first time since she lost her family.

Then news of a terrible accident compels Vianne to suddenly return to France, where she discovers proof of a wartime secret that changes everything she thought she knew about her family. Facing the threat of sickness and ruin, the people who forced Vianne out of her home now suddenly need her help.

Will Vianne find the courage to follow her heart, return to New York and her life with Giorgio? Or will duty bind her to the family she had left behind and force her to remain in France?

From Amazon Charts bestseller Ella Carey comes an utterly gripping and emotional historical wartime novel about the terrible choices people made during humanity’s darkest days. Fans of Fiona Valpy, Rhys Bowen and The Nightingale will adore this novel.

Guest Post

When I start working on a new novel, I’m increasingly finding myself asking one question: why on earth did I choose to write about a topic I know so very little about? Everything seems incredibly heady and exciting when I’m pitching a story concept to my publishers. Glamourous, alluring locations, fascinating historical settings, characters who bounce from my imagination to my fingers and onto the page. It’s easy to become swept away. But then, once it’s time to start working on the book, I find myself battling an unsettling trepidation that can seem overwhelming for a time.

In A New York Secret, Lily Rose is a young woman who is passionate about cooking. Her love of working with gorgeous ingredients, of creating beautiful food, has sustained her throughout her formative years, supported and nurtured by her wonderful grandmother, Josie. When the Second World War erupts, Lily’s passion turns into a sustainable way of earning an income, and then shifts, in the face of unspeakable tragedy in the aftermath of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, to afford her an opportunity that a young woman back in the 1940’s would never otherwise have had. When so many young American men left home to front the battle lines in Europe and in the Pacific, America needed head chefs to run their restaurants, and women stepped up to take on these roles. Lily has the opportunity to train as head chef at iconic New York restaurant, Valentino’s, and despite challenging odds, she jumps at the chance to lead a team of chefs, to source produce and to design menus that will sustain the beautiful restaurant through the war.

Similarly, in the second book in the series, it is the devastating adversity afforded by the war that propels Kate, my war correspondent in The Lost Girl of Berlin, to a ten-month war correspondents’ tour of battle-stained Europe in late 1945 and early 1946. Kate achieves heights of ambition in her own career that she never thought possible, even though she’s worked as a political correspondent in Washington throughout the duration of the war. She winds up reporting on Goering’s trial because a male reporter falls ill, and Kate’s report is the first to be broadcast all over America. However, what happens when Kate returns to New York is brutal and confronting, very much inspired by real events.

It’s been in the process of writing my new novel, The Girl from Paris, that I really discovered what the key is to defeating this kind of trepidation I was feeling about writing books where my lead characters are working in occupations of which I know so little about- sewing, honestly, I have eleven fingers, cooking, yes, I enjoy cooking, but I could not imagine being a head chef- is to understand that there is one thing that I do share in common with these formidable, unique, and brave women. 

And that one thing is passion for what I do.

It’s a love for doing that one thing that takes me away from the every-day, that inspires me to get up every morning. Lily, Kate and Vianne are all linked by this interior drive, and this connects them to me. It’s this almost indefinable something within themselves that fires them to create- to cook in Lily’s case, to get the word out there about politics and current news and to try and report the truth when it comes to Kate, and for Vianne, her love is to design beautiful clothes that make women feel fabulous, transformed, and elevated to a sparkling version of themselves.

When I pitched The Girl from Paris, it all seemed especially exotic, this world of leading fashion designers set in the dramatic first half of the twentieth century, lead, during the First World War by the sensational likes of Gabrielle Chanel, Jeanne Lanvin and Jeanne Paquin in Paris. These women not only kept one of France’s most important industries alive, they ensured that it thrived in these almost impossibly tragic years. These designers became not only names so iconic in fashion history that they are synonymous with a certain look, but these women were extraordinary trailblazers who forged ahead, despite war, despite every type of adversity. Their influence is still felt in fashion today.

What I loved so much about writing and researching The Girl from Paris, was Vianne’s intrinsic love of designing beautiful garments, the very act of closeting herself away from whatever was going on in her life, from was happening in the wider historical context around her, and her ability to lose herself in dreaming up stunning dresses, the likes of which grace the pages of the book, and which I could describe with my passion for writing, using the words I love to translate Vianne’s ardour for lovely clothes to my readers. 

Vianne’s designs bring such joy to the characters for whom she makes them, the wonderful Adriana Conti, the fabulous Katherine Carter, and Josephine Baker in Paris. 

Vianne works with love and the most meticulous attention to detail. For detail was everything in 1920’s fashion. The silhouette was simple, tubular, but the embellishments on the dresses in that era were where the magic happened. It took hundreds of hours to finish couture pieces, because the beading, and the embroidery of silk, metal, glass, jewels, silver, gold thread onto these deceptively simple garments were all integral to the beauty of the dress.

I always think that writing is an emotive art, as perhaps, is cooking, and sewing. These art forms are as old as time. I know that my writing is working because I feel emotion as I write. In the same way, I want to transfer that emotion into you, my readers, just as Lily elicited emotion in the person lucky enough to taste her lovingly prepared, beautiful food, or to the wearer who is transported into a veritable fairy-tale when dressed in one of Vianne’s bespoke, stunning gowns.

And that is how I worked around it, this fear of writing about something that is new to me.  Because deep down, these things are not new to me, nor are they something I know nothing about. My passion for writing is something that fuels, propels and drives me, no matter what. 

And I love to write about women who share this interior drive for something- no matter what it is. I love to write about how they overcame the challenges intrinsic to their time, their place, their era in the history of the world. It doesn’t signify in the end, what our passion might be for, because that can be as limitless as there are human beings in the world, but to have this love of something- anything, is indeed, a fortunate thing.

Buy Link:Amazon: https://bit.ly/3el9K4o
Audio Links:UK: zpr.io/xx93EppYYZm2
US: zpr.io/czed4tyX3wJY
https://soundcloud.com/bookouture/the-girl-from-paris-by-ella-carey-narrated-by-laurence-bouvard

Author Bio:


Ella Carey is the USA Today and Amazon charts bestselling author of eight novels of historical fiction, including the Secrets of Paris Series, published with Hachette imprint, Bookouture. Ella’s novels have reached over one million readers and have been translated into fourteen languages. Ella has recently signed a six book deal in Germany and a nine book deal in Denmark. Ella’s latest novels are A New York Secret, and The Lost Girl of Berlin, both published with Bookouture in 2021. The Girl from Paris is the third novel in this new series, and will publish in January, 2022. Ella has a music degree in classical piano, and an arts degree majoring in English and history. Her novels have been shortlisted for ARRA awards. For further information:



Ella Carey is the USA Today and Amazon charts bestselling author of eight novels of historical fiction, including the Secrets of Paris Series, published with Hachette imprint, Bookouture. Ella’s novels have reached over one million readers and have been translated into fourteen languages. Ella has recently signed a six book deal in Germany and a nine book deal in Denmark. Ella’s latest novels are A New York Secret, and The Lost Girl of Berlin, both published with Bookouture in 2021. The Girl from Paris is the third novel in this new series, and will publish in January, 2022. Ella has a music degree in classical piano, and an arts degree majoring in English and history. Her novels have been shortlisted for ARRA awards. For further information:

Buy Link:Amazon: https://bit.ly/3el9K4o
Audio Links:UK: zpr.io/xx93EppYYZm2
US: zpr.io/czed4tyX3wJY
https://soundcloud.com/bookouture/the-girl-from-paris-by-ella-carey-narrated-by-laurence-bouvard

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